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TheOuterLimits-Screenshot-oldOne of my clearest memories from my childhood is of coming home from trick-or-treating and finding my dad sitting in the dark, watching THE OUTER LIMITS on our old black-and-white TV. Back then (1964), I thought the show was weird and scary – lots of strange, eerie music. And lots of monsters.

outer_limits_architects_of_fear_9212The show reflects all the sensibilities of that time — fear of alien invasions, fear of atomic weapons, fear of things we can’t control. It’s humorous now that the monster in “The Architects of Fear,” clearly an actor in a bug-eyed rubber suit, was deemed so terrifying that some of the ABC affiliates refused to air the episode, and others blanked out the offensive scenes. Most of the special effects are primitive, and there’s a lot of melodrama lurking throughout (not to mention the female characters — a lot of devoted wives and girlfriends — who do little more than shriek and cower), but if you dig a little deeper and let go of your 21st century mindset, there’s a lot of great, scary storytelling going on. How far do we dare go to prove a point? When do we reach the point of learning too much? Is knowledge worth losing our humanity?

14789946The show was revived in 1995, and there’s some fine storytelling there as well. My particular favorite episode is “Inconstant Moon,” which stars Family Ties‘ Michael Gross as a lonely physics professor who realizes to his horror that the sun has gone nova and he has only a few hours left to live. (Ignore the incorrect description at Amazon; it’s the correct episode.) If you’re looking for something new to stream, both the 1963 original and the 1995 reboot are well worth your time… especially if you watch in the dark!

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